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AISHWARYA  SUBRAMANIAN
LEFT OF COOL

Left of Cool abandons the respectable and the popular, and turns its gaze to the odd and wonderful.

Just-So Stories from a different world

re the three Manuela Draeger stories in In The Time of the Blue Ball: Three Post-Exotic Tales, set before or after the end of the world? It's hard to tell. Meteors rain down upon the earth; the police have disappeared; fire hasn't quite been invented (though everyone knows what it is) but electricity and marshmallows have.

Approaching In the Time of the Blue Ball in translation (the translator is fantasist Brian Evenson) means that those of us who do not read French come to it without much context — the publisher's note that provides some of this context is placed at the end of the book. So it's only after the un-spoiled reader has read to the end that she learns that these are three of the (so far) ten Bobby Potemkine stories, that in France they are published in separate volumes for adolescent readers. She also learns that Draeger, as the book wonderfully puts it, "belongs to a community of imaginary authors". She's a pseudonym for Antoine Volodine, who is himself a pseudonym (or a Pessoa-style heteronym) for an unknown writer.

I was not an entirely unspoiled reader, but there's something very appealing about taking these stories on their own terms.

Bobby Potemkine is this world's version of a private detective. In the title story he and his dog Djinn investigate the disappearance of Lili Soutchane, the woman who invented fire. They do this with the help of the battes, insolent flying creatures (on one of whom, Lili Niagra, Bobby Potemkine has a crush), and an orchestra of flies.

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Volodine/Draeger’s larger project is something he (?) describes as the post-exotic, a concept he’s written on at length in various venues. But it is a literature of estrangement, one in which things have gone badly wrong.

There's an emptiness about the world; a sense that it has been lived-in but then abandoned. Everyone is cold. Factories have been shut down and towns and houses appear un-occupied. The railway station has been destroyed by a meteorite and lies in ruins, still smoking. Children have become increasingly rare. Bobby Potemkine's world has a past, but it's impossible to imagine what that past might be.

nd yet there is newness everywhere that speaks of beginnings, not endings. In "North of the Wolverines", Bobby Potemkine and his companions must rescue Auguste Diodon, one noodle among many on every plate, indistinguishable from them except for the fact that he has a name and that there's something not quite right about eating something with a name (though "it can happen to anyone to be eaten by someone or to eat someone. It's strange, but that's how it is.") In "Our Baby Pelicans" (translated by Brian and Valerie Evenson), baby pelicans appear across the city but display no sign of life. Not that our characters think of them as dead; Bobby Potemkine carries his around, strapped to his chest, and speaks to it reassuringly — to no response. It turns out the baby pelicans are merely waiting for their mothers to be invented and thus come into being — which they do when Soraya Gong, a creature who from Draeger's description I imagine as a gigantic mass of foam, transforms into a mother pelican. Noodles and foam may come to life, living creatures may turn into other things (Lili Soutchane turns into a batte); nothing is fixed in this world and everything has potential.

Volodine/Draeger's larger project is something he (?) describes as the post-exotic, a concept he's written on at length in various venues, most of which remain un-translated. But it is a literature of estrangement, one in which things have gone badly wrong, one which treats French as if it too were a foreign language. All of that is visible in these three stories, but so are other things — like kindness, and hope and possibility. A friend compared them to Jansson's Moomin books, with their small, kind stories against a vast, bleak backdrop. Yet the comparison that sits most comfortably in my head is with Kipling's Just-So Stories, for their sense of being told, and of a time when the world is being set into shape. Volodine again describes the post-exotic as "a literature of elsewhere, from elsewhere, headed elsewhere", and in In The Time of the Blue Ball I think we may have the Just-So Stories of another world.

 
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