Prime Edition

AISHWARYA  SUBRAMANIAN
LEFT OF COOL

Left of Cool abandons the respectable and the popular, and turns its gaze to the odd and wonderful.

The historical novel as wish-fulfilment

ast week in this column I wrote about Bernardine Evaristo's The Emperor's Babe, and the ways in which it can be useful to challenge our received understanding of history through competing narratives that focus on the things that better known accounts tend to gloss over. Evaristo's novel told (in verse) the story of a young black woman, a member of a minority community in the London of Roman Britain. This week I read a very different piece of historical fiction about another young black woman in London, this time in 1882.

I've said in the past that I do not often like politics to be explicitly raised in the historical romances I read. Such books tend to focus on aristocrats, and it's hard to sympathise with them when reminded of things like slavery and oppressive class and gender constructs, especially when the author is pleading with us to appreciate these characters for being slightly less awful than everyone else. If I want to read about handsome dukes in period costume, I need to pretend they exist in a magical universe that does not share a history with our own.

Courtney Milan is one of my exceptions to this rule. Her Brothers Sinister series, concluded recently with the novella Talk Sweetly To Me, is set in a 19th century England full of political agitations, strikes, suffragettes. It's also populated by, among others, clever women who work, queer people, non-white characters, and people with disabilities. Talk Sweetly To Me has for its protagonist a mathematical genius who happens to be a black woman. 

{
These books joyously take part in the wish-fulfilment that is a part of every hero story: of course we know that in most cases the social forces against them would break these characters, but sometimes we need stories of success, or simply happiness.

he general narrative of the erasure of non-white people from European history tends to insist that such people simply weren't there to be represented. It's harder to make this claim about women, but we're often told that historical gender roles were so rigid that any narrative of a woman doing something spectacular is simply ahistorical (as opposed to unlikely, which tends to be a feature of stories about heroes). An important feature of Milan's books are their afterwords which, by providing more historical context and pointing to some of the sources she drew upon for research, validate these characters' and these stories' right to exist. There's data on the presence of black doctors in London, as there is on the erasure of women's work from the history of science. She's least successful when she puts this justification of these characters' presence into the text itself (a Bengali character in the book The Heiress Effect is constantly explaining himself), but it's easy to forgive this.

Which isn't to say that the world of the books is in any way the historical truth. Milan's occasional deviations from historical records are flagged up when they occur, and some of them are significant enough to turn the whole into alternate history. What is not flagged up but is no less important is the way in which these books joyously take part in the wish-fulfilment that is a part of every hero story: of course we know that in most cases the social forces against them would break these characters, but sometimes we need stories of success, or simply happiness. Talk Sweetly To Me is lighter on both politics and drama than most of the full-length novels, and is certainly not the best of the series, but there's something wonderful in reading a romance that we expect to be difficult, and to have it be joyous and pun-filled instead.

In her afterword Milan points out, pointedly, that while her protagonist Rose's community was certainly a very small minority, there were "at least as many black doctors as there were dukes". Milan is writing in a genre where dukes are plentiful (they even show up in her other works); to invoke them here is a reminder that we choose which stories to tell, which stories we allow to frame our understanding of the past.

 
Newer | Older

Creative-for-SG


iTv Network : newsX India News Media Academy aaj Samaaj  
  Powered by : Star Infranet